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him, the people who elected him so he would defend the people. >> reporter: that could provoke more trouble after a weekend of violence hitting liberal and secular factions against morse's islamist supporters. last night in cairo, protesters threw rocks at police who fired back with tear gas. demonstrators also clashed with pro-morsi egyptians. attacks on the local offices of the muzz lum brotherhood left one teenager dead and dozens of people wounded. thousands of the president's backers staged rallies in several cities. >> we support mohamed morsi's correct decision and eventually the good from the bad will be distinguishable. we support dr. morsi. >> u.s. officials raised concerns about morsi's decree. today the state department's victoria newlyand called for calm. >> what is important to us is that these issues be slelgted through dialogues, that these issues be selgtzed democraticry. we are encouraged that the various important stakeholders in egypt are now talking to each other, that president morsi is consulting on the way forward but we're not going to prejudge where that wi
under investigation for misuse of campaign funds and was facing a congressional ethics probe. he won re-election to the house in november. jackson's seat is now expected to be filled through a special election. mortgage rates in the u.s. fell to record lows this week-- helping to boost home sales. the average 30-year loan rate dropped to 3.3%, the lowest on record since records began in 1971. on wall street today stocks moved slightly higher ahead of the thanksgiving holiday. the dow jones industrial average gained 48 points to close under 12,837. the nasdaq rose nearly ten points to close above 2,926. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: and more now on the mid east story. will the cease fire reached today between israel and hamas, hold? and what about longer-term, more difficult issues between the two sides? ray suarez picks it up. >> suarez: i'm joined now by veteran diplomat and former ambassador nicholas burns. and hisham melhem, washington bureau chief for al arabiya tv. mr. ambassador, as you heard from the reporters earlier in the program, the shooti
the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we close with poet jennifer fitzgerald on hurricane sandy's destructive path through her home town of staten island. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the
and keith ellison. >> brown: then, president obama sat down with mexico's president-elect, enrique pena nieto, this afternoon. one topic for them and for us tonight: the war on drugs, on both sides of the border. >> suarez: as lawmakers talk of reducing the country's debt, paul solman offers a history lesson on centuries of federal borrowing. >> the united states was going into default. we defaulted on many obligations to foreign creditors and to our own soldiers. >> brown: plus, every month, 1,000 young americans are infected with h.i.v., and most of those with the disease don't even know they have it. hari sreenivasan looks at a new report from the c.d.c. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporati
war and with elections they decided enough for now. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt posing new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership that has long made this country's " -- a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> the site of weapons supplied by the u.s. bombing arabs once again means that too much american craze is something that no leader in the american -- and no leader in the arab east wants right now. this morning as negotiations reached a critical stage, they were burying the night's dead. egypt is struggling to recreate itself. >> there has been a lot of cross border violence. there is no reason to oppose a new one either. not unless there is a change. >> @ gaudette's main hospital there was no -- more support from the east. libyans in turkey helping hamas believe that history is on its side. >> eight days have helped the hands of the zionist to submit to history. >> many more palestinians and israelis have been killed and wounded. death and injuries feel the same on either side. making a cease-fire in a conflict this bitter, which h
been the story in america for the past three decades. this election with a bit of a referendum on that balance of power. we will see if the president has that muscle to push that through. interesting that you mentioned mark carney. he is a hero, in my book. as one of the governors of the bank of canada, he thought -- fought the powers there. >> sure the discussion that america is having now focus on this issue of inequality that you have written about in your book? and will the election results give president obama a mandate to do just that? >> i think it should be part of the discussion. the argument sometimes from conservatives, and also from not just the 1%, but the 0.1%, is, does it make sense to focus on the rich if there is not that much revenue there? actually, i think so much money is concentrated at the top of the income distribution, there is money to be had. but equally important hit a sense of fairness. as warren buffett has pointed out, the fact that he pays taxes at an effective rate much lower to that -- much lower than that of lower-income americans, makes it ha
the election, what's next for immigration reform? ray suarez asks texas senator kay bailey hutchison and illinois representative luis gutierrez. >> warner: and on the "daily download," we look at how the obama administration is re-using digital information gathered for the campaign to rally support now. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: washington was a-whirl today with more talk of avoiding the much-discussed fiscal cliff. but as november wound down, the president suggested an agreement on taxes and spending could come in time for the holidays. >> i believe that both parties can agree on a frame work that does that in the coming weeks. in fact my hope is to get this done before christmas. >> you know me, i was born with the glass half full. i'm an optimist. >> brown: hopeful sig
president gets elected. is there something that has happened, you think, that may be leading to a greater embrace and appreciation for our culture and contribution? >> we started in 2006. i think we sensed a change in america in 2006, 2007, even before barack obama became president. i think there is more willingness to understand the story, but the story has not been told. it is the story of the europeans, the indians, and the africans building america. the kinsey collection and our family has gone about trying to say we are part of this story and that narrative is a powerful narrative of accomplishment and triumphed. over the past six years, we have been able to reach 3 million people. i mean, we have just had so many actions, so many cities, so many museums, and the general response has ben, "we did not know that." that is what we start with any time we do a performance. we want you to leave and say, i did not know that. that started in 1600, and we take you to the incredible people, whose lives were lost in obscurity. we have taken them out of their graves and given them a personality,
. >> rose: none? >> none. well from the media and elected officials, none. >> rose: the middle east and the central park 5, when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. >> rose: additional funding provided by these funders. and by bloomberg, a provider of multimedia and news and information services worldwide. from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin today with the middle east and continue our coverage of the conflict in gaza, hamas has fired close to 1,300 rockets into israel, many of them have been intercept bid the iron dome defense system, the israeli defense force is responding with air strikes on gaza, diplomatic efforts to secure a cease-fire have been unsuccessful so far. secretary of state hillary clinton met with prime minister netanyahu in a joint conflict the united states commitment to the israel is uncompromising. >> we came with a clear message, america's commitment to israel's security is rock solid and unwavering, that is why we believe it is essential to deescalate the situation in gaza. >> rose: the se
is wanted for alleged crimes against humanity following presidential elections in 2010. the egyptian president has issued a new constitutional declaration widening his powers. the presidential spokesman says they could not be appealed or revoked by any authority and has been made to protect them. >> ongoing clashes, demonstrations helped commemorate days of street fighting last november. they are part of wider malaise that -- from the egyptians that fought the government did not outline their country. the success of negotiations, how they were to make an important announcement. he gave a televised address, announcing sweeping new powers for the president. >> and the investigations and trials of all those that hold executive posts, the killing of protesters and any crimes that were committed against protesters will be open. >> in today's -- the days of mubarak, goes to replace him. ory can't be appealed cancelled, not even by the judiciary. the president take any measures he sees fit to safeguard national security. they have taken to the streets to celebrate what they see as concrete
was elected democratically in a free and fair election. think of egypt as slowly putting in place all of the various elements of a country that has greater democracy and greater respect for human rights, but it will take time. in the meantime, you will be reporting about a very loud and noisy process. by its very nature it is a very bumpy process. >> indeed, we will. thank you for joining us. turning to syria, where two car bombs ripped through damascus suburb today. it is known for being loyal to president assad. the more than 30 were killed. over 80 were injured. the attack comes as fighting inside the country intensifies, making the refugee situation even worse. according to the united nations, more than 100,000 have fled into lebanon. and thousands more are on the waiting list. the war has put huge strains on neighboring countries, leading many struggling. -- leaving many families struggling. and >> the northern border of lebanon with syria, this is where thousands of refugees have escaped in august to years to escape serious moral and war -- syria's pergo civil war. -- berchtold
mention and that election the next couple of weeks is playing into these events? do people on the ground see this -- some level of this as political posturing? >> well, absolutely. there were many, many people during the campaign who felt that perhaps-- and certainly on the flip side, on the other side palestinians and in fact palestinian president mahmoud abbas accused israel of creating this campaign or going forward with the campaign to try and sabotage the u.n. bid -- the palestinian u.n. bid and also as a ploy for election -- for garnering votes for upcoming elections. for the incumbent government. the fact of the matter is, when i spoke with people on the ground today in the south, these are the constituents that would primarily vote for prime minister netanyahu and right now they're not very happy with him and many, many people said they're withdrawing their vote in the coming election, that they will not be voting for his likud party. they're unhappy with the fact that there was a pullback from a full-scale invasion. people living in the south who, again, have been through this s
more. >> so into the u.s. election, especially given that the polls were leaning towards obama, we had taken a defensive stance already. we had gone slightly underweight equities, and added more things like high-yield mortgage debt, emerging market debt, and mortgage-backed securities, that will yield as much as capital appreciation, and investments that have lower volatility than the stock market. so we have an overweight there. those investments i just spoke about, that's about 24% of our portfolio right now, and that's definitely helped us get through the last few weeks without giving up much of our gains. >> susie: tell us a little bit about -- well, you are on the buying side with equities, what are you buying? are you in u.s. stocks? international stocks? what is the mix? >> sure. one of the interesting things i think over the last few months, and maybe this isn't putting it very elegantly, but i like to think about it as revenge of the global investor. for all of 2011, and the start of 2012, we saw the s&p as one of the world's leading stock markets. and a lot of investors said,
the election, the americans and the obama administration very upset at morsi for not doing more to protect the embassy in cairo during some of those protests there. this week, you saw this sort of new partnership developing and they were on the phone repeatedly. 11:30 at night. 2:30 in the morning from air force one. morsi was a key as far as he could see to solving this problem. he was investing a lot of his own capital with president obama was in this new partner in egypt. pete: speaking of key players, can you tell us about secretary clinton's role in all this and how that's played out? >> they were on their last buddy-buddy trip, president obama and secretary clinton and in bangkok together and visiting the reclining buddha. they were making jokes about the 2016. and joe biden's head was exploding back here. and suddenly she's on a plane zipping out of phnom penh to say we're on our way and directly involve ourselves in this. she has not played this shuttle diplomacy role in the middle east quite the way that some of her predecessors had, right? obviously kissinger and jim baker and co
are talking about but suppose we find our self election after election one winning the electorial college and not the popular vote? would that bother you? >> >> yeah. i suppose it would bother me and certainly consider a constitutional amendment if it happens all the time, yeah, but i would not -- i would not feel authorized to announce that the constitution has now changed. >> rose: does the court -- does the court that you know read the paper? does it understand the political dana milk of the moment? >> i don't know. i would have to ask each -- i think so. >> does it affect you? >> i hope not. >> rose: but is it possible that you -- >> no, i wouldn't be as unpopular a person as i am as i let it affect me. >> rose: you think you are unpopular because of protests here and there? >> well, yeah. when you want to designate -- on the supreme court -- >> i am. >> rose: yo you are there for them, aren't you? >> yeah. >> why do you think that is? i mean you have a, you have a great charming personality. you are a pretty nice fellow. i mean, you have friend across all aisles a you and ruth bad
? >> it was not. sadly, it was not an election issue and it was not much of a campaign issue at all. certainly not on the republican side because they are on the denial side of things. now, you can look forward to this next time with obama with a lot of hope but he will have to step off of the center stripe and take a position that he can put teeth behind. >> america is now producing more than ever before. by 2020, it will be self- sufficient. there is no real shift away from fossil fuels. >> it will not happen too soon. it will still be a while. we are chipping away at the need to move off of the non renewable energy sources that pollute and hurt our health. >> is chipping away enough? >> it is not as good as a sledgehammer. it is all that we have. it will take a while because we're so addicted to this. look at the power that these companies have. the look at television, you see ads that talked about how wonderful the new energy is coming from coal. how wonderful this new thing coming from gas. they just sell you on the idea. basically, advertising and the money that goes behind it, most of t
a month ago, but it continues trending higher. the pace of the increase slowed the same month as election day, and as talks over avoiding the fiscal cliff heated up in washington. fewer americans filed for unemployment insurance for the first time last week. initial jobless claims fell by 41,000 as the impact of super- storm sandy on the job market began to ease. still, new claims remain over 400,000 thanks to the storm. on wall street: the dow closed up 48 points, the nasdaq added almost 10, and the s&p 500 finished higher by three. >> susie: stocks also rose on news of a ceasefire in the fighting between hamas and israel in the gaza strip. the announcement came after a week of rocket attacks and counter-attacks that has killed an estimated 150 people. most of the dead are palestinians. and just before that agreement to end hostilities, a bomb exploded in a tel aviv bus station injuring 27. >> tom: i don't wake up trying to solve for wall street, i wake up trying to solve for our members and customers each and every day. still ahead, we talk health care reform with florida's largest heal
that inspiration on that plane? >> well, the germ of the idea was a council of action, a local council election that would be subverted by teenagers. which was a device to expose certain secrets, yes, that was the basic idea and i was excited by that idea because, it was going to give me an opportunity to explore a lot of things that are important to me, and things that obsessed me frankly. >> rose: and. >> well, for example, i just talked about the fact that i was in a very prekaren situation for a few, precarious situation and probably as poor as you could be without being homeless in uk, friends and family helped they but, you know, it was tough, and. >> rose:. >> rose: and you were writing a book and had to depend on the government? >> well, yes, i did, although i was working part-time at the, the law was you could earn up to a very small amount a week without forfeiting housing benefit which was the thing that was keeping us home so i worked up to that amount, i had a clerical job in a church at one point, so -- and then i was teaching, but we were still existing partly on benefits, i coul
the vote, a florida congressional race is resolved. we update the post-election changes in the house of representatives. >> woodruff: would building walls protect cities like new york from flooding after major storms? hari sreenivasan examines that as part of our "coping with climate change" series. >> as people continue to clean up from hurricane sandy, we look at what it could take to keep this damage from happening again. >> brown: ray suarez updates the health care reform law, as the obama administration issues new rules governing what insurers must cover. >> woodruff: and we close under the bright lights of high school football, where a trail-blazing coach puts her players' studies ahead of practice. >> you won't be playing football. we like to think we have a lot of life to live so you will too and you need to prepare for that. football is kind of just icing on the >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved econo
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)